Antoniniani

An antoninianus was valued as a double denarius but from the outset it only weighed the same as 1½ denarii.  Introduced by Caracalla in 214 AD as a silver coin (though only just over 50% pure), later emperors reduced its silver content even more as they struggled to cope with inflation.  By 270 AD, it had been debased to a small bronze coin washed over with a thin plating of silver.  Aurelian (270-275 AD) restored its size and issued antoniniani of billon, an alloy of bronze and silver in the proportion 20:1 also surfaced with a silver wash.  The reforms of Diocletian at the end of the third century saw the end of this coin, though copies were still made by unofficial local mints in the western empire into the fourth century.  Antoniniani can be identified by the radiate crown worn by the Emperor and, on the coins of Empresses, by the crescent behind the base of their neck.

If you are interested in buying any of the coins featured on this page,
please
email us to check that it is still available, quoting our reference number (beginning RC_).


Gordian III, 238 to 244 AD

RC1747_Gordian.JPG

RC 1747  – Gordian III (238-244 AD) - silver antoninianus of 238-9 AD
obverse - IMP  GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG
reverse - IOVI STATORI - Jupiter standing with thunderbolt and sceptre.
£42


RC3250_GordianIII.JPG

RC 3250  – Gordian III (238-244 AD) - silver antoninianus of 243-4 AD
obverse - IMP  GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG
reverse - MARS PROPVG - Mars advancing with spear and shield.
£45


Postumus, 259 to 268 AD

RC2819_Postumus.JPG

RC 2819 - Postumus (259-268 AD) - base silver or billon antoninianus
(Cologne mint, 265-8 AD)
obverse - IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
reverse - FORTVNA AVG - Fortune standing with rudder and cornucopia
£25


For more bronze or billon antoniniani, see ‘Coins from the Normanby Hoard’ and ‘Coins under £20

If you are interested in buying any of the coins featured on this page,
please
email us to check that it is still available, quoting our reference number (beginning RC_).